Friends and Family Day Returns!

Friendsandfamilyday

Calling all Youth fencers! Tell your friends, grab your family, because FRIENDS & FAMILY DAY is back again! 

This class is open to anyone above the age of 8 who would like an exposure to fencing. You don't even need to be a friend or family member of our current members to pop by :) Just come join us during one of the weekdays dressed in your athlete attire and take a water bottle with you! 

One Bronze and a Top 8: Success at the Cadet World Championships (Plovdiv, Bulgaria)

One Bronze and a Top 8: Success at the Cadet World Championships (Plovdiv, Bulgaria)

Qualifying to the World Championships is no easy feat - there are only 3 slot per weapon group per country. We were first stoked to have Julian and Amita qualify to represent the US and Singapore respectively at the competition; but nothing beats achieving success at the event.

Credit goes to Julian and Amita who have sacrificed, endured and triumphed. A well-deserved 7th place finish for Julian and Bronze medal for Amita indeed!

We should also not forget the crew who have supported them along the way -  coaches who have impacted their journeys, family members, and fellow club fencers. Yes, you who tried to beat them at every opportunity and made them stronger.

Here are the results in brief:

Julian

  • Table of 64: V15 - 8 (Moritz Schauer, AUT)
  • Table of 32: V15 - 10 (Shimpei Matsubuchi, JPN)
  • Table of 16: V15 - 12 (Tommaso Marini, ITA)
  • Table of 8: D10 - 15 (Vladislav Mylnikov, RUS)
  • Final Rank: 7th

Amita

  • Table of 64: V15 - 9 (Oleksandra Budenko, UKR)
  • Table of 32: V15 - 5 (Isabella Gill, GBR)
  • Table of 16: V15 - 8 (Hanna Andreyenka, BLR)
  • Table of 8: V15 - 6 (Anna Taranenko, UKR)
  • Table of 4: D10 - 12 (Nora Hajas, HUN)
  • Final Rank: 3rd

Replays of Julian's bouts can be found on: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GbfirZ_EmIA, switch the camera view to the one for the green strip.

Replays of Amita's bouts can be found on: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7FALRMhxF8, switch the camera view to the one for the red strip.

The Junior Championships will begin on 5 April. To follow the event, check out http://fencingplovdiv.com/world/.

And finally, some photos of our fencers!

Photo credits: Augusto BIzzi, taken from FIE's Facebook page.

 

What's your favourite? Ours is this:

Julian giving it all in his ukulele jam session after defeating Tommaso Marini from Italy to advance to the Top 8. His song of choice? Michael Jackson's "Beat It", of course!

Julian giving it all in his ukulele jam session after defeating Tommaso Marini from Italy to advance to the Top 8. His song of choice? Michael Jackson's "Beat It", of course!

Grab em' New Winter Merchandise!

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Pom Pom Hat (in picture) - available in pink and red, $18

Slouchy Beanie - available in ombre blue, $15

Scarf - available in pink/white and blue/white, $15

 

Grab yours whilst stocks last!

The 101 on Ratings

It’s another one of those intricacies of fencing in the US and you can add that to knowing your SYCs/RYCs/RJCCs/ROCs (by the way, we’ve done a post on that here) and the various pathways to qualification. What are ratings? Well, the short answer is that they reflect a fencer and competition level to a degree.

 But here’s the long answer.
 
There are 5 categories of ratings in the US Fencing system: A, B, C, D, E and U. U is for Unrated, which is the first rating that everyone starts off with when they start competing. So how then do you progress to higher rating? “By joining sanctioned competitions and placing high enough for them” is not even the full statement. We told you it’s complicated.
 
There are a number of elements that must be considered in totality to determine if there is even potential to be awarded a rating when you join a competition:

  1. The competition must be sanctioned. This means that the organizers of the competition must comply to certain standards set about by USFA (read: how to sanction an event) So yes, you could win at an MFA-organized event with strong fencers and not get a rating.
  2. Total number of competing fencers; of which
  3. There are rated fencers present; and
  4. These rated fencers must finish at a certain placing.

he table above, taken from AskFred, explains the ratings (also called classifications) awarded in various scenarios. The full table can be found here: http://askfred.net/Info/eventClass.php.

What does joining a Group C1 event mean? Assuming you (an Unrated fencer) join a sanctioned competition with say 20 competing fencers, of which there are 2 C-rated, 2 D-rated and 2 E-rated fencers, and that of these rated fencers, 2 of them who are C-rated and 2 of them who are D-rated end up placed in the Top 8 positions of the event, you will be awarded a rating as long as you are placed in the Top 8 too. Specifically, if your placing is between 5th to 8th, you will obtain an E rating. If between 2nd to 4th, you get a D. If you are first, you get a C.
 
Therefore, the competition level and the rating that you could get from it is dependent on who turns up and where they eventually place. But if you take a look at a listed event on AskFred, you’ll get a pretty good idea of what the level of the event is, along what the ratings that you could potentially earn:

While we do agree that ratings reflect a fencer’s capability, we say that it does so only to a certain degree. The reason is because ratings are not constantly updated after each sanctioned competition and they only reflect a fencer’s highest achievement in the given season.

Ratings do not reflect the consistency of performance.
So don't be quick to decide on the outcome of a bout based on your opponent's rating; judge their current fencing on the strip.


So what are the practical implications of ratings? There are a few:

  1. Ratings qualify fencers for events. For example, Division 1 only includes fencers who are rated A, B, or C.
  2. Ratings are used for seeding at competitions.
  3. College applications do consider ratings and rankings for student intakes.

The importance of ratings versus rankings is comparable to that of the result of one examination versus the overall grade point average (GPA). The GPA is a better reflection of the overall standard of the student, isn’t it? But that said, it is unnecessary to focus on ratings and rankings as these are indications that are not within your direct control. Focus on your craft, your skills and techniques- they are the ones that get you there.


And have fun while you're at it.